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The Expert, Speaker, Author’s Business Building Resource List

"You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help enough other people get what they want." Zig Ziglar This week I had the pleasure of holding a live Community Appreciation Q/A session for members of my community. We talked for two hours and I answered questions submitted in advance as well as questions that people who were live on the call asked for.

As we were talking, I provided a number of free and low-cost resources to help experts, speakers, authors, coaches and consultants build their businesses. Many people asked if they could have that list, so I figured the easiest way was to post it here for everyone.

Some of the categories of questions I answered included:

  • Speaking: Making money, Getting over fear, How to get booked to speak
  • Elevator speech: what to say to be concise
  • Using a VA to grow your business
  • Working with JV partners
  • Social media: For list-building, Facebook personal vs. business
  • Podcasting resources
  • Identifying your ideal customer

Based on the comments and messages I received afterwards, people were very happy with everything we discussed and what they learned. So, in order of how they were presented on the Q/A webinar, here is that resource list now:

Public Speaking Comics:

what's the worst that could happen when public speaking

One of the questions was about how to get over the fear of speaking. Of course, as a former college instructor of public speaking, I have

trained many (many!) people both before I started my business and since, how to get past the fear associated with public speaking. A few years ago, I sat down with a comedian friend of mine and we came up with 15 comics that answered the question, “What’s the worst that could happen when you’re speaking?” This was one of my favorite projects and always makes me laugh. I hope it helps you have a little chuckle, too!

21 Ways to Make Money Speaking by Felicia SlatteryHow Many Speeches Do You Need?: Free Infographic

As the author of the #1 Amazon best-seller 21 Ways to Make Money Speaking, another common question I receive is about how many speeches a business professional who wants to market their business with speaking or have a speaking business really needs. The answer, as it is with so many questions like this, is “it depends.” For example, I have been delivering my original Signature Speech™ about “Credibility and Cash Flow” since 2007. Just that one speech alone has helped me build thousands of relationships, get me some of my BEST clients, and of course made me more than a pretty penny for all these years. The best tip I have is start with the ONE speech. Make it EXCELLENT. Deliver it A LOT. Then decide if you’re going to make money with that one speech or if you want to make money speaking other ways, too. I shared the resource to pick up my free infographic, so folks could see all 21 ways and decide for themselves. If you’re interested in reading the book, you can find it here at

Podcasting for Everyone? Nope: Free webinar rebroadcast about how to podcast.

We had several questions about podcasting. One astute community member asked if podcasting was coming back (YES! – it actually never left and continues to grow) and of it’s right for everyone. The truth is, there is no “one size fits all” when it comes to your marketing. Even if you’re a speaker, podcasting may NOT be the best strategy for you. It depends on your strongest skills, your ability and desire to continue delivering quality audio content on an on-going regular basis, and the ROI you see from your podcast. Also, like all marketing, podcasting works if you do it the right way and follow a proven path to success. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. You can use your iPhone or iPad to create, edit and post a podcast easily. The webinar rebroadcast will show you all about it.

Be a Podcasting Guest: Join a Facebook Community for Podcasters

One alternative to hosting your own podcast is to be a guest on someone else’s podcast. You get exposure and marketing to a group of people who likely wouldn’t have heard of you any other way, and if the interviewer is a good one, you’ll get a really great recording you can use in Shelley Hitzother areas of your business. To get booked on someone else’s podcast, you’ve got to connect with podcasters, check out their shows, see if it’s a good fit and ask them if they’d be open to talking about having you be a guest.

Get Booked As a Podcast Guest or Speaker: Create a One-Sheet with These Templates

When you contact the podcast host, it helps to give them an idea of what you’d talk about. The more professional your pitch is, the more likely you are to get booked on a show. The same is true of being on stage. Put together a segment or podcast show guest proposal, provide the topic you’d cover in your interview, a few potential questions, an image of your book or you speaking on stage or just your head shot, your credibility-building bio and you’re on your way to getting booked!

No, You Don’t Need An Elevator Speech: Free Chapter and Resources to Help Say Goodbye to the Elevator Speech

keep calm and kill the elevator speechMy most recent #1 Amazon best-seller is Kill the Elevator Speech: Stop Selling, Start Connecting. People have LOADS of questions about this topic because everyone in business has heard we need one of these suckers if we’re going to a networking meeting, conference, trade show, or other event where we will meet people and be asked the dreaded question, “what do you do?”

The truth is, people are only going to remember 2-4 words about you anyway, the purpose of networking is to connect with other people and begin a relationship, and if you go in looking for a sale you’ll come across as the desperate salesy person no one wants to talk to.

If you don’t get out to meetings much and work primarily from home, you don’t need an elevator speech. If you’re saying more than “I’m a XYZ,” and have more than 2-4 words after that, you need to change what you say. Instead talk about what you love about your work, what lights you up, what you’re passionate about, what project you’re working on now, what your clients are up to, or what your favorite part about doing what you do is. Tell a story about your work; don’t verbally vomit marketing gibberish on someone who simply wanted to open a conversation with you but didn’t know what else to say. Get the book on Amazon or wherever fine books are sold.

My Personal 30-Day Story-Telling on Video Challenge Begins

Oh boy.

What have I gotten myself into THIS time?!

You can keep up with my progress on Facebook, YouTube and here on my blog (as soon as I’m home from my vacation and get all the videos uploaded everywhere).

I’ll tell you one thing, if it wasn’t for the accountability with my friend, video marketing expert Lou Bortone, and the public promises I made to keep this thing going, I’d have quit by now, less than a week after posting my first video.

But I’m all in. Keep coming back for a new story and lesson each day.


Multi-Billion Dollar World of Motivational Speaking – What You Can Learn

whether you think you can or think you can't you're right Henry fordLast Sunday, CBS Sunday Morning aired a story about my world: the world of the professional speaker. I found the piece interesting and enlightening from several perspectives.

First, I didn’t love the tone the reporter took about the industry that has inspired millions of people for decades. Throughout the report, her tone of voice said she wasn’t convinced that what we do to teach, motivate, encourage, and inspire others was somehow legitimate. Her incredulous, “Your BEST year EVER?” reply to the owner of a Chicago speaker’s bureau and her challenge to Wayne Dyer, “What do you say to people who think this is all just a bunch of baloney?” were telling, and frankly, a bit unsettling. Not that I would have wanted her to be a cheerleader for our industry, but a little journalistic neutrality would have been better for a story that was not presented as an expose of any sort.

And how Dyer answered the reporter’s challenge, was of course classic motivational wisdom. He quoted Henry Ford’s “Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right,” and then told her that if she or others see a lot of baloney, they must be attracting a lot of baloney into their lives. BOOM.

Beyond that, the piece had some useful information for professional speakers in it.

One lesson is from the speakers bureau owner’s perspective, who gets 15 new speakers inquiring about having his agency represent them per month, and almost NONE of those speakers fit his criteria of “very good, great, or excellent.” He says he’s not there to be people’s friend and almost proudly admits that he’s crushed a lot of dreams. That means there are a WHOLE lot of speakers out there thinking they are good enough to be paid the big bucks, (this bureau has speakers at the $20K+ level) but in reality, are not even close to having the skill they need to succeed.

That is in line with what I see in the trenches of speaking all the time. Far too may speakers are disproportionately worried about their marketing far more than they are concerned about improving their craft, stage presence, story-telling, and entertainment value of being on stage. There are some well-known speaker marketing people who will tell you to put your speaking skills into a box and put them off to the side while you work on your marketing, in essence telling you to ignore your PRODUCT.

You see, if you get paid to show up and speak, your speech and performance is your product. And if your product stinks, no amount of slick marketing can cover up that fact. Good marketing can get you hired, but if your product isn’t top notch, you’ll never get any referrals, testimonials, repeat business, or “back end” business – things like a juicy consulting contract, or physical book and product sales.

In fact, in the story, you’ll see the second piece of important information about how to succeed as a speaker: you’ve GOT to be entertaining. Now this story focuses on being funny and talks about how you should literally time yourself between big laughs and have no more than two minutes between them. However, if you’re an inspirational speaker, or an instructional speaker, or a faith-based speaker, think in terms of an emotional impact mixed in with the laughs. We are there to create an experience for the audience members.

On the other hand, there is another group of speakers who believe if they only hone their craft better, if only they could deliver that one-liner of a joke with better timing, or pause in just the right spots, they will get more gigs, and so spend far less time than they should on their outdated marketing materials, never writing those books, or not creating any products to serve the audience.

The story’s main point is that the speaking business is healthy and growing and there is room for the best speakers to succeed. Your bottom line: allow time in your business to develop BOTH your marketing AND your stage presence and speech and you will be able to make a very healthy living.

Note: For some reason, this video cannot be embedded. You can view the whole story on Vimeo here.


I Wrote This Post in My Underwear (And Other Nonsense)

picture them in their underwearThe terrible advice is everywhere.

“Picture them in their underwear.” Um, no.

“Picture them doing something demeaning like scrubbing the toilet.” Really?

“Picture them naked.” Gross.

All of the above is nonsense and ridiculous advice I’ve heard at one time or another on how to get past a fear of public speaking.

When I pull it out of context like I did in the title of this post, well, you can see the ludicrousness of telling people to imagine others in their underwear, and so forth.

Those who don’t know any better are well-meaning. They are trying to help. The idea, of course, is that theoretically, anyway, when you picture your audience members in a compromising or less-than-powerful position, you supposedly feel more powerful, and therefore better and less afraid.


You know what makes you feel more powerful? BEING more powerful in your own knowledge of what you can do for others. KNOWING that what you do for people, that your message, can truly change someone’s life for the better, whether in a tiny way or in a HUGE way.

If you are sure that you offer value to people who pay you, if you have happy customers, and if you know speaking is a powerful way to spread your message and attract new soon-to-be happy customers so you can help them with your God-given talents, but have felt held back because of fear, I invite you to a webinar I’m calling, “Get Over It! (Your Fear of Speaking.)”

Tomorrow is Halloween. There is no more perfect day to address something that feels scary, but that you still want to do – and GET OVER IT once and for all.

Now, I can’t promise that by listening to a webinar you can immediately conquer your fears forever on the spot so you are never afraid at all of speaking again (and be skeptical of anyone who says they can – that’s some pretty hypey stuff), but I CAN help you look at your fear in a different way. I CAN motivate you and inspire you to help the people who NEED you. And, just as importantly, I can give you PROVEN techniques that have worked for the thousands of people I have taught them to over the years.

People come to me privately all the time to ask for this kind of help. I want to help you, too, so you no longer have to listen to wacko advice about picturing people in their undies. Sheesh. Here the long link to join the webinar:

Tell all your fraidy cat friends, too! We’ll have some fun and maybe banish that fraidy cat feeling and empower you to speak!

Writing and Speaking = A Marketing Cycle at It’s Best for All Businesses

Question: Which came first, the book or the speech as a marketing tool?

Answer: It doesn’t matter! They are both fantastic and you can use both to sell the other!

It doesn’t matter what you do in your business. Being successful boils down to one thing: getting people to pay you for your products or services. Even if your main source of business is referrals, those referrals still need a way to discover what you’re all about. How do you do that? There are only two primary ways: in writing or by speaking. Everything else is an offshoot of those two basics.

Think about it. Even if you don’t have an official speech or you haven’t written a book yet, someone is going to email you or call you. And then you’ll have to answer in writing or by speaking to them on the phone or in person. Or they are going to Google you and run into your website where there is writing and hopefully video of you welcoming them. So let me ask you this:

Are you busy?

The answer is a big, huge, OF COURSE YOU’RE BUSY!!

So one more question: If you’re busy, why not leverage what you’re already doing to make your marketing and your life easier?

As a speech trainer and communication consultant, I’ve been on stages everywhere since the very beginning to market my own business. I started speaking in front of audiences of hundreds of people since the time I was 7 years old; so it’s natural to me. What wasn’t as natural was writing my first book. But here’s how I did it.

  • Step 1: I wrote a bunch of specific blog posts about various topics I knew my potential clients wanted to hear more about because audience members were asking me the kinds of questions I answered in the posts.
  • Step 2: Then I turned those blog posts into a fixed-term 12-week private membership site, which allowed me to fill in any blanks of tying that content together, as well as including specific activities members could do to help them implement the content.
  • Step 3: I took the 12-week membership site content, and turned that into 12 chapters of a book, plus wrote an introduction and conclusion. I added a quiz on Communicating with Confidence for one of the chapters, had the whole thing edited, learned what to do next from Kristen Eckstein to get it into print and self published that baby.

I wanted to write a book because it’s been one of those life-long bucket list things for me. Plus, most speakers worth their fee have at least one book published. So now I had a book. But then, that’s when something interesting happened.

People started to ask me to SPEAK about my book.

And then at those events where I was the featured speaker, audience members would buy my BOOK.

Then people who saw one or the other or both started HIRING ME.

It was AWESOME! One led to the other and back to the other and so on and so on…

As I went on, I decided I wanted to have some better marketing materials. Because the book and the speech were working SO well for me, I wanted to get them in front of more people. What I needed was a Speaker One-Sheet (or Author One-Sheet, depending on if you wrote your book or your speech first! LOL)

The one-sheet is a printed single-sided, brief marketing piece you can put on your website as a PDF or print and send to meeting planners about your topic. It looks all fancy and professional-like, which is how you want to portray yourself as an author, speaker and consultant, in case you didn’t know.

Next came the problem of the proverbial cobbler’s children having no shoes (that would be me not having a one-sheet!).

Shelley Hitz

Author and Speaker Shelley Hitz’s One Sheet

I know that a one-sheet is an important marketing tool. But (luckily) I was too busy to go through the gyrations of having one made. Finding a designer that didn’t flake out AND who understood me and what I wanted, trying to figure out the look and feel I wanted to convey, deciding what to put on it, well, it was time-consuming. And I realized, I’m not the only one who doesn’t have time for even the things that I know should get done.

So I created these Speaker One-Sheet Templates (using Powerpoint of all things!), because I know how to use Powerpoint and now I can crank one out in mere minutes. No hassle. Dozens of other speakers and authors have been using them, too and they all love them.

Author Shelley Hitz said:

I’ve been needing an updated one-sheet for the speaking I do and have been procrastinating hiring someone. I personally bought one of Felicia’s templates and within an hour had my one-sheet ready and added to my speaking page! WooHoo!

These speaker one-sheet templates are fast, easy, and give you a professional way to be sure you are using the full power of the speaking – writing marketing cycle.

More Ways to Use Your Speaker One-Sheet Templates for Businesses A-Z


Benecia Ponder One Sheet - updatedThe response to the new Speaker One-Sheet Templates has been amazing and exciting around here. People from all over the world and speakers with all sorts of topics have been snapping up and designing their Speaker One-Sheets since I launched them just 7 days ago. You can see one of them right here —>

When folks who aren’t yet speakers see them, they wonder if they might be able to use the Speaker One-Sheet Templates for another promotional product they have been wanting to market. The answer is a resounding YES!

You see, although I originally designed these to be specifically for speakers who want to get their speech details and bio in front of meeting planners to help them get more bookings, there is no reason you couldn’t use them as just about any marketing flyer. How about these ideas:

  • Artist: Showcase your art and highlight details about a current or upcoming exhibition and/or classes you teach.
  • Bookkeeper: Share your best tips for keeping receipts organized and highlight your services.
  • Coach: Describe your private or group coaching programs.
  • Decorator: Showcase your “after” designs and talk about your services.
  • Esthetician: Share photos of your before and after work or photos of your location, along with a list of your services or to market a new service offering to your existing clients.
  • Financial Adviser: Spotlight the best investments now or host a lunch and learn for potential clients and use the flyer as an invitation about what they will learn.
  • Group Exercise Instructor: Use any of the templates to share your upcoming class schedule, testimonials, and info about you and your studio.
  • Herbalist: Create a new flyer seasonally to highlight what herbs your clients should be using to protect themselves against various ailments (winter colds, flu, allergies, etc.)
  • Insurance Agent: Mail a flyer to your customers quarterly explaining new products, new regulations, and sharing success stories of clients who benefited from working with you and having your insurance.
  • Jazz Musician: Print copies promoting your upcoming shows, your website, and your current CDs or mp3s and provide them to all audience members.
  • Kinesiologist: Send a flyer to all current and past patients with a featured “move of the month” or spotlight various ailments that you can help improve.
  • Landscape Architect: Canvas the neighborhoods where you are currently doing work promoting your services and offering a free consult while you’re still in the area.
  • Marriage Counselor: Create a series of flyers that share various conflict resolution techniques and mail to past and current clients, or as a marketing tool to send to the homes in your area.
  • Nutritionist: Send out monthly recipes with photos, promote various programs or services to current and past clients.
  • Orthodontist: Create quick list for patients to post on the fridge of which foods are allowed and which aren’t with their new braces and answering some of the most frequently asked questions.
  • Proofreader: Share your personal info, outline your proofreading services, and share a testimonial. Put on your website and send in the mail to potential clients.
  • Quilter: Provide information at quilt shows on your work, accolades, and showcase photos of past quilts.
  • Realtor: Quickly add a featured home for sale or announce the sale of a home in the area. Send to all homes in a neighborhood.
  • Social Media Manager: Most of the templates have built-in social media icons; use yours to highlight your services or upcoming classes teaching people to use various aspects of Facebook or LinkedIn or Google+.
  • Travel Agent: Feature a cruise or vacation package of the month; provide new cruisers with a checklist of essentials to bring.
  • Upholsterer: Feature before and after photos of your work, mail to past customers with a special offer; give a checklist of how to care for newly upholstered furniture to all new customers.
  • Virtual Assistant: Create a top 10 list of the ways a VA can save a business owner time and money, explain how to choose and VA, and share information about your services.
  • Writer: Feature your latest book along with a description of it, where readers can read a free chapter, and info about you.
  • X-Ray Center: Welcome new patients with a comforting note about x-rays and answer a few commonly asked questions.
  • Youth Minister: Invite new members by including a flyer in your weekly bulletin that explains what youth group is about, sharing photos from past events, and inviting first-timers and their parents to an informational meeting.
  • Zoologist: Create series of informational pieces for field trips of children visiting the zoo.

And there you have it. A listing of how businesses from A-Z can use the Speaker One-Sheet Templates for FAR more than promoting speaking. Yes, some of these were a stretch (if you know of any careers that start with X or Z, let me know!), but many of these I know from experience of working with the to develop their Signature Speeches™ and businesses.  What other businesses can use these? I’d love to hear about yours in the comments!

To Be a Successful Speaker: Do Something First

21 Ways to Make Money Speaking by Felicia Slattery“How can I make money as a speaker?”

As the #1 best-selling author of 21 Ways to Make Money Speaking, this is one of the most frequently asked questions I get. And of course, there are at least 21 answers. 😉

But before you can make any money as a speaker you have to do something first. Multiple choice question — What’s your pick for what to do FIRST:

  • A: Good marketing? (Yes, but that’s not it.)
  • B: Get training in good delivery skills? (Yes, but that’s not it either.)
  • C: Develop a fabulous speech? (Getting warmer, but you don’t start there…)

You have to start with doing SOMETHING in your life or professional career that people want to know more about.

Look at the most highly paid speakers in the world today. Here is a partial list with their speaker fees:

  • Rush Limbaugh: In 2013, the National Conference of American Proctologists paid Limbaugh $3.8 million for one speech.
  • Donald Trump: Reportedly Trump received $1.5 million for The Learning Annex where he delivered 17 one-hour speeches in a 2-year period at real estate conferences and was paid that full amount FOR EACH SPEECH.
  • Bill Clinton: Averages $195,000 per speech; with a high of $700,000 received twice for a local newspaper publishing company in Lagos, Nigeria.
  • Tony Blair: Highest earning was $616,000 for 2 30-minute speeches in 2009 in the Philippines.
  • Nicole Kidman: Was paid $435,ooo for a 25-minute speech to a group of Forbes Global CEO comference in Sydney, Australia.
  • Alan Greenspan: Earned $250,000 speaking at a Lehman Brothers meeting after he retired as Chairman of the Federal Reserve.
  • Peyton Manning, Richard Branson, Sarah Palin, Lance Armstrong, Al Gore, and more all make $100,000 for a speech.

So what do all those folks have in common? Clearly it’s not their politics. And it’s not what they do for a living. What they have in common is that they have become well-known for what they do in the world. They are athletes, politicians, entertainers, and business professionals who have accomplished something in their careers and people want to know more about that.

Of course, those people are also celebrities in their own right, which is another thing they have in common. If you’re not a celebrity does that mean you can’t be a well-paid speaker? Absolutely not! In fact, many working speakers make a living with their speaking (or use it as a major source of income).  To be successful in speaking, you must have done something, studied something, accomplished something in your life that others want to know more about. It’s that simple. And it’s that challenging at the same time.

If you’ve long thought that you are born to be a speaker; that you have a message that’s inside you that you know will serve the world, start by taking a good look as your life and your accomplishments from the standpoint of a meeting planner. Why would someone put you in front of their audience? What do you have to share or offer that could impact people for the better? It’s your unique stories, knowledge, and experiences which will make you stand out, get booked, and be successful in the world of talented speakers.

Start by sharing those stories, knowledge and experiences in any way you can so meeting planners can get a feel for who you are and what you’re about. Here are a few ways to begin:

  • Start a blog and on it tell your stories along with a lesson that anyone could learn from reading your story.
  • Record a series of how-to videos or FAQ videos that showcase your knowledge using screen capture technology like Camtasia or simply PowerPoint (learn all about that in this free webinar).
  • Turn the camera on and look right into the lens and tell one of your stories. Similarly to what you’d do in a blog post, this will share what happened, what you learned, and what others can take away from your story. Think of it as practice before getting on stage. Post the video on your speaker website, on your YouTube channel and on social media so people see it and share it themselves.

If you feel like you haven’t yet accomplished anything or have something of value to share with an audience, don’t be so sure. If God put the feeling on your heart that you have a message to share, then you do. It might take some serious reflection and journaling time, a little digging to get there, a bit of refinement of the story and the message, but you likely have SOMETHING inside you that needs help getting out. If you’re not sure what your unique genius is yet, it’s time to find out (and I have a free webinar which talks all about your genius factor that you can watch starting right this minute!).

What’s your story? What’s your message? I’d love to hear about it in the comments!


Getting in the Media 5 Times in One Week – Whew.

felicia slattery media appearancesCall it a dress rehearsal for my upcoming nationwide launch of my next book, Kill the Elevator Speech: Stop Selling, Start Connecting later this year. Except that will be carefully planned and orchestrated. You see dress rehearsals are on my mind because last weekend was also my script-writing, stage production, and directorial debut for my daughters’ elementary school production of the show I cobbled together called, “An Evening at Vaudeville.” So mixed in with the wild speaking and media appearances, were daily after school rehearsals, with late nights of getting the program finished, pulling together costumes, and getting the volunteers organized. It was definitely a busy week.

However, my appearances in the media last week were more of a confluence of getting out there spreading my message through speaking and decent marketing, mixed in with a little bit of luck, I’ll freely admit. However, there are a few factors that led to me being featured in 5 different forms of media over the course of just one week, that I think could help your business as well.

  • Local TV – I spoke at the Batavia, Illinois Chamber of Commerce Women in Business event for a paid presentation about Credibility and Cash Flow in Social Media. The day before the event, I received an email from one of the event organizers asking if it would be okay with me to have the a local film crew to videotape my presentation for replay on their local cable access TV. So some time this week my speech will appear on cable TV. I agreed on the condition that I receive a copy of the recording to use in my marketing.
  • The lesson: Whenever anyone wants to record you, ALWAYS ask for the recording. As a speaker, you need that footage to put on your website, make a demo reel from, or at the very least share on social media as continued social proof you’re out there speaking and doing it well.
  •  Local Newspapers and Magazine – In conjunction with that same speaking gig in Batavia, the Chamber group had their PR pro send press releases to all the local papers and magazines. All I had to do was approve the copy and she sent it out. I did next to nothing to get my name in the media (not to mention the Chamber’s own websites and social media).
    The lesson: Speaking for Chambers of Commerce groups, whether paid or free, you always get the benefit of the Chamber marketing on your behalf. That often means placement in local media, which gets your name out there and allows you to become the “go-to” person in your niche.
  • Blog Talk Radio – One of my clients, Brian Basilico, has his own BTR program, BLT Radio, short for Business Life Transitions. He invited me to be a guest to discuss my upcoming book, Kill the Elevator Speech, Stop Selling, Start Connecting.
    The lesson: Write a book. That’s first. When you have a book, people want to talk to you about it. Next, Blog Talk Radio is a platform that allows the hosts to store the content, so you can go back any time and use it over and over again. If you’re not sure what to say, have a look at Signature Speech(TM) for Authors for a free gift that will get you started.
  •  Podcast on iTunes – About a month or so ago, internationally-known author, trainer, and podcaster, Alicia Dunams held a contest to see who should be her next podcast guest. Alicia and I had met years ago on social media and then in person at a live event where I was one of the speakers. I was one of the finalists and because my message about speaking would resonate well with her authors, she decided to interview me about leadership and being “all in” – the name of her podcast.
    The lesson: Know the people who are influencers in your community and in your niche. Use the internet to reach out a build relationships and meet them in person at live events so they will remember you.
  •  BBC – International TV – I recently began using a new app called “Jelly” for social questions and answers, which was released earlier this year by one of the founders and creators of Twitter, Biz Stone. I tend to jump on the newest social platforms as quickly as possible to secure my username and to check it out because many of my clients often look to me to talk about the newest communication tools. Then I was emailed by a producer for a TV programme (you have to spell it that way, because, you know, it’s British!), called “Click.” They have 330 millions viewers and were conducting a story on Jelly and would I be available to answer a few questions? Um, let me think…. YES!!!! So we scheduled it and I spent more than an hour getting the camera right, hurrying up and waiting, and doing the 10-minute interview that had to be boiled down to my 20 seconds of fame. You can see it below. They found me by being on the app. They invited me through my website, I’m convinced, because I had video of me on air to show I can do okay in a televised interview situation. UPDATE – The BBC has added the video to it’s own website right here.
    The lesson: Be in the forefront in your area of expertise. Know what the newest innovations are and the newest and hottest trends. Plus do what you can to get any kind of local TV publicity. I learned from Shannon Cherry. The national and international media are far more likely to ask you to be a guest when they know you’ll be a decent guest.

That was my big week in media and speaking. I was so wiped out it took me three days to complete this post!!!
So here it is, my big moment in the international press. The story begins at 12:07 and I come in, literally for 20 seconds, at 14:26. Don’t blink!



The Best of the Oscar Speeches

Not Quite on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, But a Girl Can Dream!

Not Quite on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, But a Girl Can Dream!

At last night’s 86th presentation of the Academy Awards, on the red carpet it was all about the clothes, the jewels, high fashion and “who are you wearing.” During the Oscars TV broadcast it was all about Ellen Degeneres, ordering pizza, taking selfies, and breaking Twitter. Oh yeah… there were some statuettes given out, too.

Today is now all about who wore it best and an analysis of the acceptance speeches. This year there were no big memorable moments like in 1999 when Roberto Benigni after just winning for best actor, was announced the winner of best foreign language film and triumphantly and excitedly climbed up and onto the arms of the seats and seat backs to bound up onto the stage, applauding his audience all the way (video here for that). Yet even so, there were some touching moments and wonderful speeches.

Yesterday, I promised to share the good, the bad, and the ugly of the speeches. Yet after watching, there were no real bad or ugly moments, just excellent and average ones. Plus, if you’ve been a reader for any period of time, you know I tend to be one for focusing on the positives.

So without further ado, here are my awards for The Best of Oscar Speeches from 2014:

Best Tribute to Mom:
Jared Leto, Best Actor in a Supporting Role for “Dallas Buyer’s Club.” Not only did Leto bring his Mom with him to the event, he thanked her in a sweet way by telling her story. He then had the audience’s attention for when he briefly mentioned the political and humanitarian cause, dedicating his Oscar to AIDS patients around the world.

What You Can Learn: Stories touch the heart and capture your audience’s attention and admiration. Start your presentations with a story and you’ll have your audience hanging on your every word.

Best Location to Keep Your Speech: Catherine Martin, Best Costume Design for “The Great Gatsby.” When Martin arrived on the stage to accept her award, she was smart to be properly prepared for the possibility that she might win and had written her speech and stored it safely — inside her brassiere tucked safely where she wouldn’t lose it and would easily have access to it. Go see how she did it with humor and grace.

What You Can Learn: Be prepared. If there is even a slight chance someone is going to ask you to say a few words, know what you plan to say. It’s also OK to bring notes and to keep them in a place you will quickly and easily access them, even if it does bring some fun laughs with it! :-)

Best Collaborative Acceptance Speech: It’s a tie!! Both winners worked on the animated musical, Frozen. The winners of Best Animated Picture Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, Peter Del Vecho delivered their speech, each saying one phrase at a time in order. The winners of best original song was, “Let It Go” also from “Frozen,” music and lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. The married duo clearly were prepared with a fun song-like speech, starting their speech being grateful the names of their fellow nominees they wanted to share rhymed!

If there was any category that could be discussed as having some bad or even ugly moments in awards acceptance speeches it’s this one. There were many collaborations that won Oscars and many of them all came to the stage to accept their awards together. But then, in the limited amount of time given for their speeches, only one person got to share his or her thanks and left the others hanging to shout “thank you!” as the band began playing and they were being ushered off stage. That was ugly (sad) to see.

What You Can Learn: When you’re working on stage with others, find a way to share the spotlight by PLANNING ahead. Don’t hog the moment or allow someone else to not allow you to properly share your gratitude when it counts so very much. Planning in advance requires practice and conversation long before the moment of truth.

Best Sung Speech: In the Best Documentary category, the film “20 Feet from Stardom” won with producers Morgan Neville, Gil Friesen, Caitrin Rogers, but the most memorable part of their presentation came from one of the film’s singers, Darlene Love, who sang her thanks and message, “I sing because I’m happy!” Even at the time of her acceptance – of an award she didn’t win herself – Love made sure everyone remembered her. Watch here.

What You Can Learn: To be memorable, do something to stand out from the crowd. Do something unexpected. Love brought the audience to their feet and you can, too, by daring to be different.

Best Speech That Wasn’t Live: Prior to the BIG telecast last night, Angelina Jolie was given the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her work in Africa and around the world and she *almost* made me like her. A little. That’s saying something because I’m not now, nor have ever been, a fan of hers. Yet watching her talk about her mother and humbly accepting her award went a long way to improving my opinion of her and likely the opinions of many others who may have felt about her the way I have. You can see the recorded presentation of that here and watch her reaction from the show last night.
What You Can Learn: Humility and true gratitude go a long way.

Best Use of Imaginary Friends on Stage: Spike Jonze winner of Best Screenplay for “Her.” This may have been one of the oddest and more uncomfortable moments of the night for me watching at home. While accepting his award, Jonze looked to his left and spoke mainly to Robert DeNiro and Penelope Cruz, who had nothing to do with the film, but did present him with his Oscar. He thanked his friends saying they were there with him on the stage, behind DeNiro and next to Cruz. But they weren’t, except maybe in his imagination. What worked was how sincere he was and thanking his friends. Next time, it might have worked a little better had he done it less weirdly. Unfortunately, I could find no video of his speech.

What You Can Learn: Try your ideas and material out on real people before doing it on stage. Get someone knowledgeable and who you trust to give you honest feedback. Otherwise that idea that sounded great in your head may not translate as well as you’d like it to in real life.

Best Bi-Lingual Acceptance Speech: Alfonso Cuaron, Best Director for “Gravity.” “Gravity” took home a number of technical awards last night, so when it came to best director, Cuaron was no surprise. What was a refreshing surprise was to see Cuaron, who is from Mexico, deliver part of his acceptance speech in Spanish. Again, there’s no decent video of this to connect to. Bummer.

What You Can Learn: Be true to who you are and people will love you for it.

Best Women-Power Speech: Cate Blanchett, winner Best Actress for her role in “Blue Jasmin.” Blanchett was lovely, funny, and strong starting with tell the standing ovation audience, “Sit down, you’re too old to be standing!” She did a lot of things during her speech well, including thanking her sister nominees, but most notably Blanchett talked about how films about women are not niche and that they earn money – see it here. Let’s hope filmmakers listen to the buzz that’s come from her comments.

What You Can Learn: When you present well, you can share your views in a way that is fun, interesting and will get people talking about you and your cause.

Best Speech Thanking God: Matthew McConaughey, winner of Best Actor for his role in “Dallas Buyers Club.” One of the top acceptance speeches of the night, McConaughey blended emotion, gratitude, humor and fun into a wonderful presentation. Often we hear people thank God in their speeches, but this year there didn’t seem to be as many. So kudos to McConaughey for giving props to his beliefs. He also did a great job in honoring his mother and wife and family, told a great story about how he strives to be his own hero, and ended on a strong note quoting his famous “Dazed and Confused” character, “Alright, alright, alright.” Nice.
What You Can Learn: Many of the lessons from other Oscar acceptance speeches last night apply here as well: tell a story, share your gratitude, and be yourself.

Best Speech of the Night: Lupita Nyong’o, for best Supporting Actress in “12 Years a Slave.” Wow. This first-time nominee and winner blew us away with a perfect example of a beautiful, eloquent and elegant acceptance speech. She thanked the people who made the movie and finished by motivating children everywhere that if they have a dream, it can come true saying, “When I look down at this golden statue, may it remind me, and every little child, that no matter where you’re from, your dreams are valid. Thank you.” This child is inspired and motivated!! I wish I could find video of her entire speech to embed here, but it appears the Academy has made most copies be taken down except what appears to be those sanctioned here. Scroll down to see this heartfelt speech.

What You Can Learn: As you can see from this list of the best speeches at the Oscars, most of were good for one reason or another. What was most striking about this speech is that this young woman from Kenya, who had never appeared in any movie of any kind burst onto the scene doing what she loves, living in her genius, and took home the ultimate award possible in her business. That success story is motivational and exciting to see and to know that when we walk in our own genius the rewards for anyone can be great. Go see more about walking in your own genius here.
I’d love to see in the comments what your favorite speeches were and what moments you enjoyed!

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